Is Technology Good or Bad For Travelers?

Is Technology Good or Bad For Travelers?

When a young traveler first begins to picture a backpacking trip around the world, their mind conjures images of dog-eared guidebooks, dusty and undiscovered pathways through landscapes previously only imagined, and a growing sense of the unknown slowly morphing into the known, for the more they will navigate the world, the more their viewpoints will change. Buses packed with locals and chickens on incorrect schedules, trying desperately to navigate their way from one city to another, and when they arrive, quizzing natives on which places they can stay for the night, only to find the accomodations filled with spiders or simply mattresses on the floor. They imagine the feeling of staring at a menu written entirely in a foreign language and simply pointing to an item and hoping for something less than disgusting to come from the kitchen, and if they’re lucky, they’ll have something delicious they can tell their friends about. They picture Jack Kerouac. Hunter S. Thompson. Jane Goodall. This is what backpacking looks like. And that was the case. 

Thirty years ago. 

Or twenty years ago.

Or maybe even as recently as ten years ago. 

Read More

The Perfect Week In Slovenia: A Six Day Itinerary

The Perfect Week In Slovenia: A Six Day Itinerary

What else does Slovenia need to gain a foothold in the European itineraries of travelers? Why are the views of Lake Bled or the Skocjan Caves or the emerald green Soca River not on Buzzfeed's clickbait list of "27 Surreal Places You Should Visit Before You Die"? Why do people constantly ignore bloggers referring to Slovenia as their "favorite country they've visited"? How many times must it be referred to as "The Next Big Thing In Europe" before it finally breaks through and actually gets there? Why do travelers use Ljubljana as a one-day stopover on their way to Croatia when it should be the other way around? What else does Slovenia need? Does it need a cosmopolitan capital with plenty of activities and a bustling city center? Some of the most varied and beautiful natural areas in Europe? Kind and inviting citizens eager to have tourists learn about their nation and history? One of the most majestic and surreal small towns in the entire world? Great food in every restaurant? Great wine you've never even imagined? 

Slovenia has all of these things and more; and we're going to tell you how to spend the perfect week on the sunny side of the Alps.

Read More

The Issue With Venice

The Issue With Venice

Slow travel is the new buzzword in backpacking. Slow travel is the absolute best way to experience a city, they say. Live like a local, they say. Paying to go on a tour while you travel is the epitome of lameness. If a restaurant is listed on TripAdvisor and you eat there, YOU SHOULD JUST GO AHEAD AND KILL YOURSELF BECAUSE YOU'RE JUST A DUMB TOURIST PUT A CAMERA AROUND YOUR NECK AND PUT THE MAP ON THE GROUND AND GET IN IT!  God forbid you only spend a few days in a destination, you may as well have just stayed home. But what happens when you don't need two weeks to see a city? What happens when you arrive in a city that is hundreds of years old, absolutely beautiful, steeped in history, but the entire city is just one large area with the popularity of Times Square? And everything in the city is priced accordingly at Times Square level insanity? How do you live like a local when the locals number only fifty four thousand and the tourists number have grown to over thirty million a year? Do you stay for a week in the name of slow travel? Or do you try and fit as much into a one night stay because you basically blew your budget on a small room a forty minute bus ride from the city center? 

This is the issue with Venice.

Read More

The Best Time Of Day To Visit The Paris Catacombs

The Best Time Of Day To Visit The Paris Catacombs

We didn't spend a lot of time in Paris. Truth be told, we don't love ridiculously large cities (Our favorite city thus far in Europe has been Ghent), but it didn't seem right to be traveling through Europe without seeing The Most Romantic City In The World. While we had a great time, and there will be more to come on Paris (Wait until you read about our Secret Food Tour we went on - SPOILER ALERT we ate almost a pound of cheese and lived to tell about it), we hit most of the tourist-y spots in the span of a morning and spent the rest of the time drinking wine and eating cheese. I also spent a VERY frustrating two hours trying to get a cell phone SIM card set up, but let's not dwell on that. We walked from Notre Dame, past the Louvre, through the Jardin Des Tulienes, past the Paris Eye and Concorde Square, down the Champs Elysses (whistling this song the whole time) to the Arc Du Triompf, followed the River Seine to The Eiffel Tower and as they say in France VOILA. Tourist tour finished, pictures taken, let's get some prix fixe lunch with wine. 

Read More